Just a quick one

I’m on nights at the moment, my favourite type of shift. So I’m just going to do a quick little post. Firstly, to all the people who emailed me after Tom Reynold’s “interview” in the daily Mail – no I have absolutely no intention of quitting, I love my job and unless something cataclysmic happens I can’t see me leaving it any time soon and no, I don’t fear for my life every time I go on a job, it’s East London not some war-torn country! oh and my pub was in Dover (Kent) and I loved it! Despite the fact that the article looks to the untrained eye like it was penned by the man himself, anyone who knows him personally or by his blog writing would know that although he did the interview the article has been written (and sensationalised slightly) by someone other than him.

On to other things. If you call an ambulance and it turns up and you manage to shout at the nice ambulance lady “why aren’t you doing anything, I’m dying, I can’t breathe, why aren’t you doing anything you lazy ambulance person” in one breath then the chances are that the ambulance lady was right and you can, infact, breathe. Believe it or not we have to do training before we’re let loose on the public, and can recognise when someone is about to die. If you then choose to ignore the advice that the ambulance lady gives you about how to make yourself feel better, please don’t be surprised when she offers little sympathy when you next shout “I can’t breathe, help me, I need some kind of medication.” I believe the particular person I’m referring to found that nursing staff and doctors also use a similar theory…

There’s nothing like crawling under my duvet when the rest of the world is dragging itself up for another day at the office, so it is with some pleasure that I say – “I’m off to bed, have a great day!”

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~ by Laura on July 18, 2007.

2 Responses to “Just a quick one”

  1. Getting under the duvet after a long hard night shift—-HEAVEN, even better if the rain is lashing at the window—yea

  2. If the patient can bellow across the unit ‘I can’t breathe’ then usually they are ok. The ones I worry about are the quiet ones.

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